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Overview

As organizations experience success with the reporting/monitoring from their initial IIoT implementation objectives, their thoughts and questions naturally turn to how many devices and how many different things they can put on the same platform to inform them of other aspects of their operations. In fact, the relatively low cost to track additional nodes on the installed platform makes them wonder what they “can’t” remotely monitor and control. These are some of the initial questions.

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How Many Things can be Monitored at Once?

Without consideration for distances (but assuming the Transceiver nodes can talk to at least one Gateway device), hundreds and thousands could conceivably be connected to a single Gateway in a given installation. Factors that would play into the maximum number of nodes would have to consider the configuration parameters of the devices, but could be configured to support a significant number of devices. Additionally, since the Transceivers can connect to up to 16 points, the actual number of “things” that can be monitored is an order of magnitude greater.

 

How Many Different Kinds of Things can be Monitored?

Again, without consideration for distances (but assuming the Transceiver nodes can talk to at least one Gateway device), any manner of device that produces (or could be made to produce) an electric signal can conceivably be sensed and the measurement recorded and reported/monitored. If something doesn’t currently produce an electrical signal, some means of measuring the state of the device would need to be put in place so that the Transceiver could gather the information and transmit it electronically. For example, some devices may already be installed that produce a signal (a light switch can be monitored to see if the light is on/off since it is already electric). An alternative example would be measuring the light intensity of the sun – in this case a photocell could be put in place and could measure the light level and the Transceiver would measure the signal from the photocell and report it.

 

How Many and How Different of Things can be Controlled?

Similar to the monitoring noted above, different approaches can be employed to control something from the range of a simple single digital signal (ON/OFF) to the more complex RS-485 communication with a Programmable Logic Controller (PLC). Thus, there is support for a large number of devices across a significant range of device types.

 

 

Conclusion

The Cellio Wireless Network has been designed to be quick, affordable, and high quality. Cellio Wireless Transceivers allow the Cellio system and customers to quickly and easily expand existing systems with as many sensors and controllers as they like (with minimal incremental expense).  The data collected in the back-end data system can be easily and rapidly mapped and provided for view on PC’s, tablets, smartphones, etc. both via browser views as well as automatically generated native mobile app views. Sharing and modifying the dashboard views is quick and easy. All of this is available in place today. There is a saying that you should “Inspect what you expect”.  If, like many organizations, your organization is diving into remote monitoring across a facility, a process, or the entire enterprise, having an extensible platform that is easy, quick, and inexpensive to deploy that supports the broad range of existing and future devices that need to be monitored and controlled, test Cellio on your tougher challenges to make sure you have the best platform in place for today and into the future.

Overview

We have heard a number of customers say the following phrase, “because we don’t have someone there watching it all the time.” And for equipment and supplies that are critical to the operation of the business, certain failures need to be identified as soon as they happen (if not before). With inexpensive devices that can be placed in and around the assets in an operation, the ability to monitor devices in real time can provide insights that could be used for advance notification as well as notifying anyone/everyone involved so that critical issues can be resolved as quickly as possible. In some ways, not only can the Cellio IIoT devices help to make and save money, they can also be considered as inexpensive insurance.

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IIoT Devices to Identify Issues Before, During, After Failure

The very nature of IIoT devices deployed in a distributed manner in and around the assets in the operation translates into constant monitoring. What is monitored, and how, is critical to generating the information that can be used to determine if things are within, if they are trending out, or if they have exceeded acceptable operating parameters.   Armed with this information, critical elements in the operation can be remotely monitored, reported, and produce notifications to equipment and process owners for preventative maintenance and issue resolution. Most importantly, if the issue is located in a place that is not typically monitored in some other way, the IIoT device can assure that if something goes awry that someone gets notified – immediately. The IIoT device, via the sensor, detects the “out of bounds” condition, generates an alert that is relayed via the Gateway device to the back-end. The back-end evaluates the state and based on the priorities and settings of the organization, notifies those people and resources appropriate for the response. If used for collecting data regularly about the state of the equipment (or inventory level), the information could notify relevant stakeholders about potential issues that could lead to a failure before the failure occurs. Depending on the impact of a failure, detecting it in advance might be more valuable then simply fixing things after they fail.

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Conclusion

The Cellio Wireless Network has been designed to be quick, affordable, and high quality. Cellio Wireless Transceivers allow the Cellio system and customers to quickly and easily expand existing systems with as many sensors and controllers as they like (with minimal incremental expense).  The data collected in the back-end data system can be easily and rapidly mapped and provided for view on PC’s, tablets, smartphones, etc. both via browser views as well as automatically generated native mobile app views. Sharing and modifying the dashboard views is quick and easy. All of this is available in place today. There is a saying that you should “Inspect what you expect”.  If someone isn’t able to watch critical resources 24×365 having affordable devices that are watching the critical resources may very well be the best option for assuring and insuring that issues are detect and resolved as early as possible – ideally averted all together. When you consider that these humble devices can be deployed and provide alerts to situations that could cost Million$, you might start to wonder if a case could be made to an insurance company for reduced premiums.